FireNet Community Flag Counter
October 24, 2014, 04:20:21 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: The FireNet forum has now been located on another server that will now be its regular place. The database has been tidied up and although all your messages are still there you may experience a  missing avatar. Thanks again for your support and any question please get back to us and we will try our best to help.  All the best Kurnal & Colin
 
   Home   Help Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: how often does emergency lighting need testing and who can carry this  (Read 20926 times)
hrr
Newbie
*
Posts: 4


View Profile
« on: April 11, 2008, 01:54:05 PM »

I have read conflicting info as to whether it should be checked monthly, 6 monthly and 3 yearly , and other info saying the 6 monthly test is now not needed , which is correct ?

Also can anyone be nominated as the responsible person to do the 3 yearly tests? or do they need specific qualifications ?
Logged
nearlythere
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3950



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2008, 04:08:50 PM »

Quote from: hrr
I have read conflicting info as to whether it should be checked monthly, 6 monthly and 3 yearly , and other info saying the 6 monthly test is now not needed , which is correct ?

Also can anyone be nominated as the responsible person to do the 3 yearly tests? or do they need specific qualifications ?
Emergency Lighting Testing & Maintenance

You must ensure that regular checks and periodic servicing and maintenance is carried out whatever the size of the premises and any defects put right as quickly as possible.

You, or a competent person nominated by you, can carry out certain checks and routine maintenance work. A competent person is someone who has the necessary training or experience, access to the requisite tools, equipment and information, and is capable of carrying out a defined task.

Maintenance may need to be carried out by a competent service engineer.
Where contractors are used, third party certification is one method where a reasonable assurance of quality of work and competence can be achieved.

It is recommended that checks and tests are carried out as follows.

Daily Check

All safety lighting units will have a visual indicator, usually a small red lamp, which, when functioning normally, will be illuminated. This indicates that the unit battery is receiving a constant electrical charge from the mains. This indicator lamp should be checked daily for operation.  This simple check can be undertaken by staff who routinely work in a particular area for units in that area.
Any defects should be reported immediately for remedial attention.

Monthly Check

Switch on in the emergency mode by operating the unit’s test facility. If an integrated test facility is not provided then the sub circuit (not the mains supply) for that particular area should be interrupted for a period sufficient for all units to be checked that they are present, clean and functioning correctly.

At the end of the test the supply should be restored and a final check of each unit to ensure that the mains supply indicator lamp is operating normally.

The date and results of the test should be recorded and any defects reported for immediate remedial attention.

Six Monthly Check

Each unit should be tested as for the monthly check except that the period should be 1 hour for a 3 hour unit and 15 minutes for a 1 hour unit.

The date and results of the test should be recorded and any defects reported for immediate remedial attention.

Annual Check

Each unit should be tested as for the monthly check except that the period should be as per the full battery duration of the unit. This can be between 1 and 3 hours.

The date and results of the test should be recorded and any defects reported for immediate remedial attention.
Logged

A cheap Fire Risk Assessment can be very costly.
hrr
Newbie
*
Posts: 4


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2008, 05:53:53 PM »

how do you tell what the battery duration of the unit should be ?
Logged
kurnal
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5730



View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2008, 07:21:02 PM »

Nearlythere
Didnt the 2004 update to BS5266 eliminate the 6 monthly checks (even the special arrangements for new installations) and just leave a monthly check test and an annual full duration test?
That was my understanding- but I may be wrong.
Logged

Ricardo
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 279


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2008, 12:10:42 PM »

As far as I am aware the only tests now recommended are the monthly functional test, and the annual discharge test.
Logged
hrr
Newbie
*
Posts: 4


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2008, 12:22:57 PM »

Ricardo, how long is the annual test ? 1hour ?
Logged
Ricardo
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 279


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2008, 09:11:10 PM »

Quote from: hrr
Ricardo, how long is the annual test ? 1hour ?
hrr, I dont have a copy of the BS at hand at the moment, but as I recall, all luminaires should be tested to their "full rated duration" on an annual basis, therefore a one hour emergency lighting unit would be tested for one hour, and a three hour EL, would recieve a three hour test.

I am sure the BS 5266-8 states that care should be taken  to ensure that full duration tests are carried out at a time that any risks to occupants of a premises is minimised. Ideally the test should be carried out at a time when the premises can be devoid of emergency escape lighting for 24 hours (recharge time of the batteries)
Logged
hrr
Newbie
*
Posts: 4


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2008, 11:43:18 PM »

Thanks but how do you tell if its rated at 1 hour or 3?
Logged
AnthonyB
Firenet Extinguisher Expert
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1919



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2008, 12:20:41 AM »

The six monthly test is indeed now defunct except in the eyes of maintenance contractors who can't be bothered to keep abreast of guidance changes, contractors not wishing to loose the income from the test & E/L manufacturers who can't be bothered to update the booklets they include with their fittings.

Fire Protection contractors wishing to screw as much out of customers as possible often do three monthly duration tests when doing fire alarm service visits

Old pre 2004 intervals:Daily visual, Monthly function, Six monthly partial duration, Full duration on third year after install, then annually thereafter

Current intervals:Daily visual, Monthly function, Annual full duration

In theory all the tests could be done 'in house' with an electrician only required if a unit fails, but whilst this is simple for the daily & monthly tests, it's not often time practical for the annual one to be done by site staff.

Despite references in guidance, most fittings now in service are of the 3 hour duration, regardless of whether the application requires this.
Logged

Anthony Buck
Fire Risk Assessor for a BAFE SP205 accredited consultancy

Extinguisher/Fire History Enthusiast

Fire Extinguisher Facebook Group:
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=65...415&ref=ts
http://www.youtube.com/user/contactacb
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/anthony-buck/22/957/36b
Graeme
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1347



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2008, 09:19:42 AM »

Quote from: hrr
Thanks but how do you tell if its rated at 1 hour or 3?
you would have to physically look at all the units and look for a sticker that will tell you. Most fittings are 3hr so will need a 3hr duration test once a year.
Logged
Wiz
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1583



View Profile
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2008, 06:47:21 PM »

Quote from: AnthonyB
The six monthly test is indeed now defunct except in the eyes of maintenance contractors who can't be bothered to keep abreast of guidance changes, contractors not wishing to loose the income from the test & E/L manufacturers who can't be bothered to update the booklets they include with their fittings.

Fire Protection contractors wishing to screw as much out of customers as possible often do three monthly duration tests when doing fire alarm service visits

Old pre 2004 intervals:Daily visual, Monthly function, Six monthly partial duration, Full duration on third year after install, then annually thereafter

Current intervals:Daily visual, Monthly function, Annual full duration

In theory all the tests could be done 'in house' with an electrician only required if a unit fails, but whilst this is simple for the daily & monthly tests, it's not often time practical for the annual one to be done by site staff.

Despite references in guidance, most fittings now in service are of the 3 hour duration, regardless of whether the application requires this.
AnthonyB, I've noticed from many of your posts that it seems that you don't think much of contractors. Was you bitten by one as a small child?
Logged
Wiz
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1583



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2008, 06:49:01 PM »

Quote from: hrr
Thanks but how do you tell if its rated at 1 hour or 3?
Quite often the part number might give you an idea i.e it might include: 1M or 1NM or 3M or 3NM  (1= 1hour, 3= 3hour, M=maintained, NM= non-maintained)

p.s. to older members - Whatever happened to good old Sustained?
Logged
Wiz
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1583



View Profile
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2008, 06:56:46 PM »

Quote from: AnthonyB
........Despite references in guidance, most fittings now in service are of the 3 hour duration, regardless of whether the application requires this.
The only difference for a manufacturer between a 1Hr unit and a 3Hr unit is the standby battery size and cost. The difference in cost these days would only be a £1 or £2. Having just a 3Hr version saves on stocking requirements for manufacturers/distributors/installers and the extra stocking costs for two versions would wipe out the minimal battery cost saving. Obviously it doesn't matter if you install a 3Hr version in a 1Hr application. I've seen approved 3Hr non-maintained units for less than £10 each!
Logged
AnthonyB
Firenet Extinguisher Expert
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1919



View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2008, 03:54:33 PM »

Quote from: Wiz
Quote from: AnthonyB
Despite references in guidance, most fittings now in service are of the 3 hour duration, regardless of whether the application requires this.
AnthonyB, I've noticed from many of your posts that it seems that you don't think much of contractors. Was you bitten by one as a small child?
LOL! It would seem that way!

Sadly it is because in a substantial numbers of premises we inspect we find contractors giving out of date advice or requiring uneccessary maintenance checks - if it was only once in a blue moon it wouldn't be as bad.

Now if the occupier took a risk based decision to go over & above the recommended norm then thats fine, but that is so rarely the case I've only seen it once.
Logged

Anthony Buck
Fire Risk Assessor for a BAFE SP205 accredited consultancy

Extinguisher/Fire History Enthusiast

Fire Extinguisher Facebook Group:
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=65...415&ref=ts
http://www.youtube.com/user/contactacb
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/anthony-buck/22/957/36b
nearlythere
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3950



View Profile
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2008, 04:11:41 PM »

Quote from: kurnal
Nearlythere
Didnt the 2004 update to BS5266 eliminate the 6 monthly checks (even the special arrangements for new installations) and just leave a monthly check test and an annual full duration test?
That was my understanding- but I may be wrong.
No, you are not wrong, I am just a pratt. Fell for the glossy brochure instead of reading the white paper.
The 6 monthly is kaputt. Anyway, good to see you are reading my posts.
Logged

A cheap Fire Risk Assessment can be very costly.
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!